During times like this when our world may seem like it has turned upside down, we can become overwhelmed. We may have any number of a variety of stressors, fears, and the avoidance of dealing with the unknown future.

Does any of this look familiar?

  • Difficulty concentrating.
  • Feelings of numbness, disbelief, anxiety or fear.
  • Physical reactions, such as headaches, body pains, stomach problems, and skin rashes.
  • Too much energy and no way to use it.
  • A strong sense of no ability to control anything.
  • Changes in appetite, energy, and activity levels.
  • Difficulty sleeping or nightmares and upsetting thoughts and images.
  • Worsening of chronic health problems.
  • Feelings of worthlessness because you’re out of work.
  • Feeling “stir crazy” for sheltering in place for an extended period.
  • Change in your faith practices or perception of faith-based leaders.
  • Anger towards God.
  • Anger in general or having a short temper.
  • General irritability.
  • Change in use of alcohol, tobacco, or other drugs.
  • Obsessions like watching news all day, chronic hand-washing, or social media information overload which is fraught with false information.
  • Loneliness. Even with others around.

These signals are often present during times of distress. Experiencing any of these at a time like this is OK. For now.

* If you are unusually worried, have any troubling or concerning physical or behavioral signs, or are thinking about killing or hurting yourself or anyone else, dial 911 immediately. *

There is help. There is hope. *

Click here to visit our COVID-19 Resources page for the excellent resources we have chosen specifically for you at such a time as this.

Responding to Community Tragedies

Behavioral Health Resources To Foster Resilience


 

The emotional toll from the mass shooting in Orlando, Florida and other areas, continues to resonate both locally and nationwide. Following a tragedy of this magnitude, mental health support can make a substantial difference in beginning to heal a traumatized community. SAMHSA has tools and resources to support survivors, community members, responders, and behavioral health providers to foster recovery and resilience.  Resources for Survivors, Community Members, Responders and Behavioral Health Providers can be found at our ATSS Resources link.

About ATSS

Traumatic events such as natural disasters, war, terrorism, territorial conflict, violent victimization and sudden unnatural loss have affected individuals in all communities globally. The Association of Traumatic Stress Specialists (ATSS) is an international organization dedicated to excellence in services and support to individuals impacted by these and other events.

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Our Mission

The mission of the Association of Traumatic Stress Specialists (ATSS) is to organize, educate and professionally certify its worldwide membership in order to assist those affected by trauma. ATSS provides and promotes opportunities for training and education in the field of traumatic stress, and professionally recognizes evidence of service, education and experience by those individuals engaged in trauma treatment, services and response.

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Management & Contact Info.

Jayne Crisp, CTS, Administrator
5000 Old Buncombe Road, Suite 27-11
Greenville, South Carolina 29617 USA
P: 864-294-4337
M: 864-420-2379
admin@atss.info

COVID-19

Compiling the ideas of our experts, researchers from around the world, and other networks of organizations comprised of current best practices in the realm of emotional and spiritual care, we offer a list of helpful ways to respond to what we will call, for lack of a better phrase, “coronavirus fatigue.”

Here are some creative and practical ideas for all of us.

Ways to help keep yourself on track.

Options to share with others who are open to staying healthy or becoming healthier.

Ways to help bring you up out of that “funk.”

Ways to help you stay well to provide assistance to others.

FACTS. FACTS. FACTS. It's essential to stay informed about the new policies being implemented and any updated guidelines you should follow. But keep your focus on the facts without adding the "what ifs.”

Be careful what you believe and what you share.

Do your best to verify information before believing it or passing it on. Snopes’ Coronavirus Collection is one place to start. Medical schools, universities, research centers, and government resources are usually excellent and timely sources of vetted and verified information.

We all need to do our part to avoid spreading

false rumors and creating unnecessary panic.

Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media.

Stay Social. Make it a priority to stay in touch with friends and family. If you tend to withdraw when depressed or anxious, think about scheduling regular phone, chat, or Skype dates to counteract that tendency.

During this time of physical distancing, substitute video-chatting if you’re able. Face-to-face contact is like a “vitamin” for your mental health.

Write a letter to another and mail it!

Social media is a powerful tool. It reminds us we are not alone. That said, be mindful of how social media is making you feel. Don’t hesitate to mute keywords or people who are making you feel like you just want to smack them! And log off if it’s making you feel worse.

Do not let coronavirus dominate every conversation. It’s important to take breaks from stressful thoughts about the pandemic to simply enjoy each other’s company—to laugh, share stories, and focus on other things going on in our lives.

Do not judge your anxieties. Go easy on yourself.

Do not judge others for their anxieties or reactions. People are going to miss out on sports tournaments; graduations; weddings and funerals; along with countless other celebrations over the next few months. It's important for all of us to keep the bigger picture in perspective, but we still need to give ourselves (and those around us) permission to feel the way we do.

Practice far-reaching acceptance. Right now, the only constant is change. Letting go of the things you cannot control will help you focus on the things you can.

Maintain a routine as best you can. Even if you are stuck at home, try to stick to your regular sleep, shower, school, meal, or work schedule. This can help you maintain a sense of normalcy.

Take time out for activities you enjoy. Read a good book, watch a comedy, play a fun board or video game, journal, play some music or an instrument, make something—whether it’s a new recipe, a craft, or a piece of art.

Get out in nature, if possible. Sunshine and fresh air will do you good. Even a walk around your neighborhood can make you feel better.

Find some way to exercise to burn off stress impacts. Staying active will help you release anxiety, relieve stress, and manage your mood. Take a walk in your house, your yard, or your neighborhood.

Avoid self-medicating. Be careful that you’re not using alcohol or other substances to deal with anxiety or depression.

Donate to food banks. You can help older adults, low-income families, and others in need by donating food or cash.

Be a calming influence. Being a positive, uplifting influence in these anxious times can help others and you feel better about our situation.

Be kind to others. All others. Infectious disease is not connected to any economic, geographic, or ethnic group – speak up if you hear negative stereotypes that only promote prejudice.

Reach out to others in need. If you know people in your community who are isolated—particularly the elderly or disabled—you can still offer support.

Perhaps an older neighbor needs help with groceries or fulfilling a prescription. You can always leave packages on their doorstep to avoid direct contact.

Maybe they just need to hear a friendly, reassuring voice over the phone.

Do some relaxing. When stressors throw your nervous system out of balance, relaxation techniques such as deep breathing, prayer, meditation, and yoga can bring you back into a state of equilibrium.

Have fun! It's a serious situation, but taking time to do the things that make you smile and laugh can make daily life more enjoyable. Find the small joys in the situation, like getting to spend more time with loved ones, cooking or watching funny movies.

Be grateful. Spend some time thinking about the things that make you feel grateful. Then express your gratitude to others. Tell your friends and family how much you appreciate them.

Take control of the things you can control. Focus on the aspects of your daily routine that you can still follow — or create a new routine that suits your current situation. This can help you stay on track throughout the day, as well as allow you to continue progressing toward your bigger life goals.

Seek help when needed. If distress affects activities of your daily life for several days or weeks, talk to a counselor or clergy member.

Additional Helpful Resources

Please check out some of the excellent and creative resources that people just like you have gathered to share.

HANDOUTS

ATSS Info One-Pager - This is intended to be printed on both sides of one sheet of paper and folded vertically into thirds for a small, handy, practical picture of stress responses and helps. Feel free to share it, make copies, etc.

Other handouts are available on some of the sites below under ONLINE RESOURCE COLLECTIONS

SHORT VIDEOS

Mark Lerner’s CRISISstream®

https://www.crisisstream.com

ONLINE RESOURCE COLLECTIONS

PAR Partners International Resource Page

https://parpartnersinternationalinc.com/covid-19

Healthline’s Resources

https://www.healthline.com/health/9-resources-for-coping-with-coronavirus-anxiety

ISTSS

https://istss.org/public-resources/covid-19-resources

APPS FOR YOU SMARTPHONE

Anxiety & Depression Association of America

https://adaa.org/finding-help/mobile-apps

This Way Up

https://thiswayup.org.au/12-free-apps-to-help-you-beat-str

Children's Resources

"Cora and the Corona: One Little Girl’s Journey to Healing in Quarantine" is a resource for children during this world pandemic.
You can download the colouring book version for FREE at https://lp.constantcontactpages.com/su/gempRsH.

 Please keep us posted with what may be helpful or what else you would like to see for your needs or the needs of others.

Thank you for doing your part!

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Uniformed Services Resources

Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress develops and disseminates a wide range of educational resources that advance its expertise in military health and mental healthand disaster behavioral health

Department of Defense Office of Warrior Care Policy is led by a team of individuals who have dedicated their careers to ensuring that our Nation is providing its Service members with the proper resources to recover, rehabilitate, and reintegrate or transition to civilian life post-wound, illness, or injury (under governmental resources)

Helpline Heroes offers online training for mental health providers supporting firefighters through trauma and common occupational stressors

Mental Care Needs in Combat Veterans After Cancer Diagnosis discusses the psychological and traumatic impact of a diagnosis of cancer among veterans.

Military Veterans PTSD Reference Manual provides a wide range of information on PTSD including causes and effects, traditional treatment, and non-traditional treatment

National Center for PTSD is committed to improve the care of Veterans through research into the prevention, causes, assessment and treatment of traumatic stress disorders and education of Veterans; others affected by trauma; professionals; and policymakers

Point of View - PBS Documentary on PTSD "Of Men and War" follows over the course of five years the men and their families on their grueling paths to recovery as they attempt to make peace with their past, their loved ones, and themselves

PTSD Anonymous (PTSDA) is a concept for a peer-to-peer, mentor networking forum to discuss the everyday struggles of living with PTSD (TBI, MST, and other military related issues) and to explore possible solutions with others in a safe and caring environment

PTSD Documentary addresses the possible causes, effects and potential treatment of PTSD told through the stories of three brave veterans

PTSD Foundation of America mission is to combat PTSD, bring healing, raise awareness and network

Tips for First Responders, 3rd Edition - The authors of this 28-page booklet offer tips disaster responders and other first responders can use during emergencies and routine encounters to support and communicate with people with disabilities. The booklet is divided into sections that focus on older adults and on people with service animals, mobility impairments, autism, multiple chemical sensitivities, cognitive disabilities, and hearing or visual impairments. (Under non-governmental reources)

Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS) offers help, hope, and healing to all those grieving the death of a loved one serving in America's Armed Forces

Understanding PTSD provides general resources for PTSD and offers links for veterans

What Veterans Should Know About Sleep

Walk the Talk First Responder Peer Support - A Boots on the Ground Peer and Trauma Support Systems Guide by Staff Sergeant (Retired) Brad McKay, CTSS and Staff Sergeant (Retired) Sylvio A. Gravel, describes a step-by-step approach to a boots on the ground peer support and wellness system for organizations:  / ISBN#9780988131668

Printed/Media Materials

-Apps for Smart Phones

eCBT Trauma - This ambitious prolonged exposure app allows end users to assess their PTS symptoms, learn relaxation and grounding practices, identify and log their thoughts and feelings, challenge their assumptions and reduce the emotional charge of triggers through progressive exposure exercises. That’s a lot to expect from an app, being as how a lot of prolonged exposure recipients bail on a live therapist, but even if people only do the relaxation and grounding aspects, they’ll be ahead of the game. It also provides access to directories for finding local therapists, support groups and educational information on PTS.

Help Kids Cope — This free mobile app provides information to help parents and other caregivers, teachers, counselors, and others to prepare for and talk about disasters with kids. The app features tips and checklists to help with disaster preparation; information about how children typically respond to disasters; and links to kids’ books, activities, and other resources. Developed by the NCTSN and other organizations, the app runs on iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch, as well as Android devices.

PFA Mobile™ — Available free of charge and compatible with iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch, and Android devices, this app is designed to help responders with providing Psychological First Aid in disaster-affected communities. The app identifies the eight core PFA actions, helps responders use interventions appropriate for specific survivor reactions, and expedites assessment and referral of survivors.

PTSD Coach - (The National Center for PTSD App) This is a pretty comprehensive, well designed, free app that allows users to pre-select friends & support networks; favorite, calming pictures and music. It offers info about PTS; a self-assessment tool; guided techniques, suggestions for managing symptoms and a place to find resources. The heart of this app is of course the symptom management. It randomly shuffles a breathing exercise; progressive relaxation; some plain but decent ‘positive imagery’; a cognitive behavioral intervention called RID; and quite a few suggestions for distraction, grounding and changing attitude/perspective. Altogether, this is a pretty complex and sophisticated app that offers a lot of strong interventions in a fairly simple, user-friendly way. The PTSD Coach app can help you learn about and manage symptoms that often occur after trauma.

PTSD Eraser - This app is a simple guided meditation using deep breathing, locating where stress is held in the body, and imagining blocked energy releasing and flowing again. It’s really a simple audio intervention with no interactivity, but it’s decent, non-emotional imagery that won’t trigger unwanted reactions from the listener. See more at

SAMHSA Behavioral Health Disaster Response Mobile App (Free)
Offers first responders immediate access to field resources for aiding disaster survivors. Has the ability to search for and map behavioral health service providers in the impacted area, review emergency preparedness materials, and send resources to colleagues.

The SAMHSA Disaster App allows disaster behavioral health responders to navigate resources related to pre-deployment preparation, on-the-ground assistance, and post-deployment resources. Users can also share resources from the app via text message or email and quickly identify local behavioral health

SAMHSA Disaster Recovery Kit - (Emergency Mental Health and Traumatic Stress Resource) Arms disaster recovery workers with a toolkit on mental health awareness. Includes materials for responding effectively to the general public during and after a disaster and in dealing with workplace stress. Also includes materials for the general public. Access the Disaster Kit right on your smartphone with the award-winning SAMHSA Disaster App. Learn more and download the app

T-2 Mood Tracker - This app encourages better self-attunement and connecting with feelings by allowing end-users to rate their moods, track and graph their results over time, and send or save status reports on: • PTS

-Articles

A Close Look at PTSD Among Aging Adults

El Paso Strong: How One Community Prepared for a Shooting they didn’t Know was Coming

SAMHSA Disaster Technical Assistance Center Supplemental Research Bulletin Behavioral Health Conditions in Children and Youth Exposed to Natural Disasters, September 2018

Sleep After Trauma

Support and Resources for Shooting Victims In Lafayette, LA and Other Traumatic Incidents offers resources for assistance and recovery for survivors

Understanding a Veteran with PTSD

-Books

35 Ways to Help a Grieving Child. The Dougy Center. The Dougy Center for the Grieving Child provides 35 practical suggestions for helping children, teens, and their families cope with the loss of a loved one in this short but valuable book.

Guiding your Child through Grief, by Mary Ann Emswiler. The New England Center for Loss and Transition offers expert advice to help a child grieve the death of a parent or sibling.

Helping Children Cope with the Loss of a Loved One: a Guide for Grownups, by William Kroen. Age-specific advice detailing what children can understand.

How Do We Tell the Children? A Step by Step Guide for Helping Children Two to Ten Cope When Someone Dies, by Dan Schaeffer and Christine Lyons. A practical guide for anyone who works with children includes a “Crisis Checklist” with scripted answers to children’s frequently-asked questions.

No Open Wounds - Heal Traumatic Stress NOW by Dr. Robert L. Bray, Ph.D. discusses complete recovery with Thought Field Therapy and can be purchased via Dr. Bray’s website

Talking with Children about Loss -- Words, Strategies, and Wisdom to Help Children Cope with Death, Divorce, and other Difficult Times by Maria Trozzi.

The Art of Grieving the Death of a Child by David Labrum and Judy Jones features stories of people grieving the death of a child

The Wounded Yellow Butterfly by Linda Diaz, LPC, CTS is a resource for children who have experienced a loss: and can be purchased via: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Trauma Therapy and Clinical Practice -- Neuroscience, Gestalt and the Body by Miriam Taylor weaves together neuroscience research and the experience of trauma, taking a fresh look at how original Gestalt theory informs our current understanding of trauma therapy:  / EBook ISBN: 978-0-335-26310-3

Walk the Talk First Responder Peer Support - A Boots on the Ground Peer and Trauma Support Systems Guide by Staff Sergeant (Retired) Brad McKay, CTSS and Staff Sergeant (Retired) Sylvio A. Gravel, describes a step-by-step approach to a boots on the ground peer support and wellness system for organizations:  / ISBN#9780988131668

When Children Grieve - For Adults to Help Children Deal with Death, Divorce, Pet Loss, Moving and Other Losses by John W. James and Russell Friedman. Concrete suggestions of things to say and do with a child to help acknowledge the loss and grieve in healthy ways.

The H.U.G.S. Program addresses the needs of traumatized and bereaved students who are socially and educationally struggling. For more information contact Christine Dernederlanden at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

-Children's Books

Coping with Grieving and Loss, by Sandra and Owen Giddens. Ages 11 and up. Offers teens and pre-teens strategies for coping - explaining the stages of grieving, how to deal with friends and family, the funeral, anger, guilt and depression, changing emotions, and where to go for help.

Death, by Barbara Sprung. Ages 8-12. Discusses what it feels like to experience the death of a loved one, outlines the stages of grief and mourning, and describes ways to honor or remember someone who has died.

Lifetimes: a Beautiful Way to Explain Death to Children, by Bryan Mellonie. Ages 3-8. This book explains to children that death is a part of life and that, eventually, all living things reach the end of their own special lifetimes.

Part of Me Died, Too - Stories of Creative Survival Among Bereaved Children and Teenagers, by Virginia Fry. Ages 8 and up. True stories of young people reflecting on their experiences with the deaths of pets, family members, or friends. Straight Talk about Death for Teenagers: How to Cope With Losing Someone You Love, by Earl Grollman. Ages 11 and up. A poetic and thought-provoking book for teens who have experienced the death of a friend or relative.

The Saddest Time, by Norma Simon. Ages 5-8. In these three stories, children come to terms with the death of an uncle, a classmate, and a grandmother. Help Me Say Goodbye : Activities for Helping Kids Die: A Guide to Understanding Death, by Laurie Krasny Brown and Mark Brown. Ages 4-8. Explains in simple language the feelings people may have regarding the death of a loved one and the ways to honor the memory of someone who has died.

-Children's Picture Books

Badger’s Parting Gifts by Susan Varley. Ages 3-8. After Badger dies, his friends take comfort in the special memories they have of the things they did together.

A Story for Hippo: A Book About Loss by Simon Puttock. Ages 3-7. Hippo and Monkey are best, best friends and when the wise old Hippo dies, Monkey is very sad until Chameleon helps him remember the stories he and Hippo shared.

-Manuals

Healing after trauma skills (H.A.T.S.) is a manual for professionals, teachers, and families working with children after trauma and disasters / National Child Traumatic Stress Network: (NCTSN)

New York Disaster Interfaith ServNew York Disaster Interfaith Servicesices is a comprehensive resource tool designed to enable NYC religious leaders to best serve their congregations and the public as they respond to and recover from disasters

SAMHSA Disaster Kit arms disaster recovery workers with a toolkit on mental health awareness. Includes materials for responding effectively to the general public during and after a disaster

Spiritual Care and Mental Health for Disaster Response and Recovery provides information on disaster preparedness, response and resources

-Tip Sheets

Becoming Stronger at the Broken Places

College Students: Coping After the Hurricane

Coping With Grief After Community Violence

Faith Communities and Disaster Mental Health

Helping the Elderly Recover From the Emotional Aftermath of a Disaster

Helping Victims Heal

Helping Victims of Mass Violence and Terrorism

Longer Term Reactions to Traumatic Events - Post Traumatic Stress Reactions

Psychological First Aid for First Responders: Tips for Emergency and Disaster Response Workers

Psychological First Aid: Spiritual Leaders and Practitioners

Support for Mass Shooting Victims in Las Vegas, Nevada

Tips for College Students: After a Disaster or Other Trauma: R U A Survivor of a Disaster or Other Trauma?

Tips for Survivors of a Disaster or Other Traumatic Event: Managing Stress

Understanding Traumatic Grief for Individuals Experiencing the Traumatic Death of a Loved One

Vulnerable Populations & Disaster

What Victims Want to Say to Clergy

You Are Not Going Crazy! Stress Reactions Following a Sudden Traumatic Experience

- Tip Sheets / Resources for Children, Youth, Parents, and Other Caregivers

A similar tip sheet is available in Punjabi here

Children and Disaster

Guidelines for Working with Grieving Children

Helping Children Cope With Disaster

Helping Children Cope with Trauma and Loss

Helping School-age Children With Traumatic Grief: Tips for Caregivers

Helping Teens With Traumatic Grief: Tips for Caregivers

Helping Young Children With Traumatic Grief: Tips for Caregivers

Parent Tips for Helping Adolescents After Disasters

Parent Tips for Helping Infants and Toddlers After Disasters

Parent Tips for Helping Preschool-age Children After Disasters

Parent Tips for Helping School-age Children After Disasters

Teacher Guidelines for Helping Students After a Hurricane

Tips for Survivors: Coping With Grief After a Disaster or Traumatic Event

Tips for Survivors of a Disaster or Other Traumatic Event: Managing Stress

Tips for Survivors of a Disaster or Traumatic Event: What To Expect in Your Personal, Family, Work, and Financial Life

Tips for Talking with and Helping Children and Youth Cope After a Disaster or Traumatic Event: A Guide for Parents, Caregivers, and Teachers

-Tip Sheets / Resources for Spanish-Speaking Populations:

Ayudando a los/las Niños/as Después de un Desastre Natural: Información para Familias

Cómo Recuperarse de las Consecuencias Emocionales de un Desastre para Ayudar a Las Personas de Edad Avanzada

Consejos para Estudiantes Universitarios: Después de un Desastre u Otro Tipo de Trauma

Consejos para Que Los Padres Ayuden a Bebés y Niños Pequeños Después de un Desastre

Consejos para Que Los Padres Ayuden a Los Adolescentes Después de un Desastre

Consejos para Que Los Padres Ayuden a Los Niños de Edad Escolar Después de un Desastre

Consejos para Sobrevivientes de un Desastre u Otro Evento Traumático: Manejo del Estrés

Sugerencias para Hablar con Niños y Jóvenes y Ayudarlos a Hacer Frente Después de un Desástre o un Evento Traumático: Una Guía para Padres, Cuidadores y Maestros

- Tip Sheets / Resources for Tribal Populations

Tips for Disaster Responders: Cultural Awareness When Working in Indian Country Post Disaster

Tips for Disaster Responders: Understanding Historical Trauma When Responding to an Event in Indian Country

Trauma in Indian Country: A Guide for Professionals

-Video/Documentary

Mindfulness: Tao of Living not Surviving | Jeff Cartwright | TEDxJIBC

6 Tips to Help Someone You Love with PTSD provides “hands on” tools for helping

Point of View - PBS Documentary on PTSD "Of Men and War" follows over the course of five years the men and their families on their grueling paths to recovery as they attempt to make peace with their past, their loved ones, and themselves: http://www.pbs.org/pov/ofmenandwar/ Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Resilience provides information on how to prevent and manage trauma

PTSD Documentary addresses the possible causes, effects and potential treatment of PTSD told through the stories of three brave veterans

Non-Governmental Organizations

2018 Guide: The Link Between Childhood Trauma And Addiction In Adulthood provides comprehensive information regarding the relationship between trauma and addiction.

A Guide to Ending Dating Violence Against Women addresses multiple factors that include the scope of the problem, factors that keep women trapped in abusive relationships, accessing help, and state resources for domestic violence.

A Survivors Guide to Sexual Assault provides statistical data on rates of sexual assault, addresses myths, identifies risk factors, offers coping strategies, and provides resources available in all 50 states.

AddictionCenter.com provides information for people suffering from PTSD who self-medicate with drugs and alcohol

Canadian Critical Incident Stress Foundation is a charitable organization dedicated to the mitigation of disabling stress and the fight against Post Traumatic Stress Disorder for Emergency Service Workers and Communities that have been involved in or exposed to traumatic events

Coping with Disaster provides suggestions for helping children with cognitive disabilities following disasters

David Baldwin's Trauma Information Pages focus primarily on emotional trauma and traumatic stress, including PTSD (Post-traumatic Stress Disorder) and dissociation, whether following individual traumatic experience(s) or a large-scale disaster

DrugRehab.com provides information and a Resource Guide on PTSD and addiction and how the two can co-occur

Exploring the Personal Side of PTSD takes a look at the differences in perspective between people diagnosed with PTSD and people who do not have PTSD.

Gift From Within is a non-profit organization with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) information and healing resources (articles, ptsd videos and dvds, poetry, art, stories, webcasts,) for people suffering from traumatic events like child abuse, accidents, natural disasters, and sexual assault

Green Cross Academy of Traumatology is an international, humanitarian assistance, non-profit corporation, established in 1997 to bring together world leaders in the study of traumatology for the purpose of establishing and maintaining professionalism and high standards in the care of trauma victims and responders throughout the world.

International Critical Incident Stress Foundation (ICISF) mission is to provide leadership, education, training, consultation, and support services in comprehensive crisis intervention and disaster behavioral health services to the emergency response professions, other organizations, and communities worldwide. 

International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies (ISTSS) is an international interdisciplinary professional organization that promotes advancement and exchange of knowledge about traumatic stress

Mental Care Needs in Combat Veterans After Cancer Diagnosis discusses the psychological and traumatic impact of a diagnosis of cancer among veterans.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network mission is to raise the standard of care and improve access to services for traumatized children, their families and communities throughout the United States

National Disaster Interfaiths Network (NDIN) is a national network of disaster interfaith organizations working together to reduce disaster-caused human suffering through the exchange of information and cooperative support

National Organization of Victim Assistance (NOVA) mission is to champion dignity and compassion for those harmed by crime and crisis

PTSD Recovery Meetup Groups provides locations of PTSD Recovery Meetups

PTSD Self Test provides a self-assessment tool, and includes information on the signs and symptoms of PTSD, risk and resilient factors, and self-care strategies.

Recall Report is a leading online recall aggregator with emphasis on mental health and prescription drugs

Screening for PTSD provides an online questionnaire that identifies the various symptoms of PTSD

The Sidran Foundation helps people understand, manage, and treat trauma and dissociation

Strategies for Trauma Awareness and Resilience (STAR) is a research-supported trauma awareness and resilience training program that brings together theory and practices from neurobiology, conflict transformation, human security, spirituality and restorative justice to address the needs of trauma-impacted individuals and communities.

Tips for First Responders, 3rd Edition - The authors of this 28-page booklet offer tips disaster responders and other first responders can use during emergencies and routine encounters to support and communicate with people with disabilities. The booklet is divided into sections that focus on older adults and on people with service animals, mobility impairments, autism, multiple chemical sensitivities, cognitive disabilities, and hearing or visual impairments.

Traumatic Incident Reduction Association is an International Association of practitioners using TIR and related techniques (TIRA)

Tuck discusses the relationship between trauma and sleep

Understanding PTSD provides general resources for PTSD and offers links for veterans

A Guide to Ending Dating Violence Against Women

Governmental Links

Department of Defense Office of Warrior Care Policy is led by a team of individuals who have dedicated their careers to ensuring that our Nation is providing its Service members with the proper resources to recover, rehabilitate, and reintegrate or transition to civilian life post-wound, illness, or injury

Disaster Distress Helpline 1-800-985-5990 and receive immediate counseling. This free, confidential, and multilingual crisis support service is also available via SMS (text TalkWithUs to 66746)

Family Violence and Sexual Assault Institute (FVSAI) mission is to improve the quality of life for individuals on local, national and international levels by sharing and disseminating vital information, improving collaborations and networking, conducting research and trainings, assisting with direct professional services, program evaluation, and consulting to promote violence-free living. 

Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) primary purpose is to coordinate the response to a disaster that has occurred in the United States and that overwhelms the resources of local and state authorities

Helping Victims of Mass Violence & Terrorism provides a toolkit for developing a comprehensive victim assistance plan that can be incorporated into your community’s existing emergency response plan.

National Center for PTSD is committed to improve the care of Veterans through research into the prevention, causes, assessment and treatment of traumatic stress disorders and education of Veterans; others affected by trauma; professionals; and policymakers

National Child Traumatic Stress Network improves access to services to traumatized children, their families and communities throughout the United States.

National Institute for Mental Health provides comprehensive information about PTSD to include signs and symptoms, risk factors and treatment

National Mass Violence and Victimization Resource Center is charged with developing a national victim-centric framework that addresses best practices for preparing for and responding to incidents of mass violence and domestic terrorism.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline - Call 1-800-273-TALK (1-800-273-8255), or, for support in Spanish, call 1-888-628-9454.

Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) channels funding for victim compensation and assistance throughout the United States, raises awareness about victims’ issues, promotes compliance with victims’ rights laws, and provides training and technical assistance and publications and products to victim assistance professionals.

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) provides information on six key principles of a trauma-informed approach and trauma-specific interventions, addresses trauma’s consequences and suggestions to facilitate healing

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA): Behavioral Health Conditions in Children and Youth Exposed to Natural Disasters, September 2018

The Trauma Center at Justice Resource Institute provides clinical services, offers training, consultation, and educational programming for post-graduate mental health professionals. Our Certificate Program in Traumatic Stress Studies has state-of-the-art seminars, lectures and supervision groups

Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS) offers help, hope, and healing to all those grieving the death of a loved one serving in America's Armed Forces

Membership

Members become part of an established group of some of the most internationally recognized experts in the field of trauma.

Learn More

Certification

Certifications entitle members to be recognized as having met a rigorous standard of training, education, knowledge and experiential requirements in trauma services, trauma response or trauma treatment

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* Promote Your Training!

Learn how ATSS can promote your training and provide it with recognition toward certification!

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Support and resources available!

For victims, survivors and caregivers of Charleston, SC, Lafayette, LA and other traumatic events, resources can be found on our Resources link and at: http://ovc.gov/news/lafayette.html

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